My Hebrew Dictionary

Shalom talmidim tovim… good students of Hebrew,

A suggestion – after each lesson practice writing out the Vocabulary list.

An excellent idea is to create your own dictionary :
“My Hebrew Dictionary” – מילון עברות שלי (Milon Yvrit Sheli)and enter new words as you learn them.

You can use letters from the Illustrated Letters page (found under Hebrew Helps) as dividers and to decorate each letter’s page. They are available in large and small letters and you can enjoy designing your own layout.

We recommend using a three-ring binder, which helps you add pages as you build your Vocabulary and you can store your charts from Hebrew Helps in back.

Here is Cindy’s great binder-dictionary as an example!

HB Dictionary Title Pageunnamed-1

Dictionary Sample Page

Download the Vocabulary Table HERE

 

Have fun!
Morah Keren

Illustrated Aleph-Bet Letters

 

alef-bet

ALEPH-BET
Drawings by Ze’ev Raban
Verses by Levin Kipniss

Published in Berlin — 1923

Beautiful calligraphy and verse introduce each letter of the Aleph-Bet.

You can access the digital book HERE.

The Center for Jewish History grants permission for the material to be used for personal, research and educational purposes. We have provided below a pdf file of the full page of each letter for you to download and include in your Hebrew Bytes Dictionary.

Also available are small and medium sized pictures of each calligraphy drawing for making the dividing pages.

Please note that the following files are large so the full Aleph-Bet requires two downloads.

FULL PAGE ALEPH-BET

aleph full page

Aleph (Part 1)
Bet  (Part 2)

T’MUNOT K’TANOT – SMALL PICTURES

kuf

Aleph  (Part 1)
Bet (Part 2)

T’MUNOT G’DOLOT – LARGE PICTURES

gimmel

Aleph (Part 1)
Bet (Part 2)

Numbers in Hebrew

Cardinal Numbers 1 – 10

Hebrew numbers have masculine and feminine forms.  The feminine form is generally used for regular counting and, for example, in telling the time and telephone numbers.

jpeg cardinal numbers

See and Download Chart – Cardinal Numbers HERE

Ordinal Numbers  – Days of the Week 

Hebrew uses ordinal numbers for the days of the week, following the pattern of Creation.

Day 1 – Yom Rishon;  Day 2 – Yom Sheni;  Day 3 – Yom Shlishi,  etc.

Days Chart

Yom is a masculine noun, so the masculine form of the ordinals is used. The feminine form adds either the letter hey, giving the ending an ah sound, as in rishonah, shniyah, or a tav, as in shlishit, revi’it, chamishit.

See and Download Chart – Days of the Week Chart HERE

Numerical Value of Hebrew Letters

Each letter has a numerical value and numbers often are  written using the Hebrew letters.

aleph = 1; bet = 2; gimmel = 3; dalet = 4, etc.

Meaningful insights can be discovered in the relationship between the Hebrew letters of words in Scripture and their numerical value.

See and Download Chart – Numbers in Hebrew HERE

The Sofit Letters

THE SOFIT LETTERS

jpeg Sofit Letters 2

Five Hebrew letters are formed differently when they are found at the end of a word. Though their form changes, their pronunciation remains the same. I (Cindy) had read in a paper by Dr. Walter Marshaleck, Ed.D. an acronym helpful in remembering these five letter — Cave Men Need Fatz. 

Download a PDF file of the Sofit Letters HERE

Writing the Aleph-Bet

HEBREW ALEPH TO TAV

Hebrew Bytes

WRITING THE ALEPH-BET

Blessed are you O Lord our G-d, King of the universe,
by whose Word – and all its letters – the heavens and the earth were made.
(Psalm 33:6)

Learn how to write the Aleph-Bet. Download a simple practice guide HERE

*photo credit michel D’anastasio

The Hebrew Aleph-Bet

Hebrew Bytes

By the Word of the Lord the heavens were made, And by the breath of His mouth all their host.
Psalm 33:6

The Sages taught that the letters of the Aleph-Bet were the building blocks of this world. They drew this understanding from the first four words of Genesis — Bereshit bara Elohim et… “In the beginning G-d created… et…” Et is not a translatable word. Et‘s purpose is to point to the direct object of the sentence. It is spelled את – aleph and tav.

The Sages say that in the beginning G-d created all the Hebrew letters from aleph (the first letter of the Aleph-bet) to tav (the last letter) and from these letters all life sprang – including Torah, the Word of Life.

The Hebrew word for letter is ot – which means sign or wonder. It is the same word used for ‘sign’ in Isaiah 7:14:

Therefore the Lord Himself will give you a sign: Behold, a virgin will be with child and bear a son, and she will call His name Immanuel.

From one (Cindy) who considers herself a beginner with this amazing language, I can tell you that just learning the letters of the Alpeh-bet will open up the Word in a way you have yet to see.

Download a PDF file of the Hebrew Aleph-Bet HERE

*photo credit michel D’anastasio